Emerald

Emerald

Emerald is a variety of the mineral beryl (Be3Al2(SiO3)6) colored green by trace amounts of chromium and sometimes vanadium. Beryl has a hardness of 7.5–8 on the 10 point Mohs scale of mineral hardness. Most emeralds are highly included, so their toughness is classified as generally poor.

Ice

So here are some random images I’ve collected from Internet browsing. Sorry there aren’t any credits, captions, or any pertinent info as to where these came from… But I don’t remember how and where and why I collected these. Just thought I’d share. Cheers!

Frozen Waterfall

Glacial Creek

Ice Cave

Ice Boulder

Blue Pool

Art and Philosophy in Badiou’s HANDBOOK OF INAESTHETICS

Just stumbled across this blog and like it. A lot.

Daniel Tutt

The relationship between art and philosophy has centered on the linkage of truth to both fields. The work of art is always finite, and as such may be the only finite thing that exists. The problem of the linkage between the two is not philosophy, which never contains truth; the problem is the singularity of the artistic schema. In Alain Badiou’s new Handbook of Inaesthetics, he makes a clear argument for art to find a new schema and linkage to the event of truth.

How can an artistic production (which is always a finite and singular project) be linked to a philosophical schema that transcends the dominant paradigms of the twentieth century – a task the avant garde has heretofore been unable to achieve.

Let’s start by unraveling Badiou’s vocabulary and definitions of the event, the artistic schema, and truth. For Badiou, the artistic production that ruptures an event…

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Soda Fired Commercial Clays

So I wanted to see what all of my locally available commercial clay looked like in our Soda Kiln. I took 12 commercially available clay bodies tested in this base recipe to get an idea which were more likely to flash:

10 Nepheline Syenite, 10 200m Silica, 80 Clay

For good measure I threw in a few Shino glazes, and tried calcined EPK for the hell of it (I actually wanted to see if it deflocculated like the rest of them.. it didn’t really…)

From the 100g test batches, I then tested each slip/shino on Laguna 550 Porcelain, B-Mix, and Miller 510 Stoneware in 2 firings that were unfortunately pretty similar in atmosphere and soda introduction. First firing on top, 2nd on bottom. Tiles were scattered throughout the kiln, so some got blasted, others not so much.  Standard body reduction and reduction firing to cone 9/10, heavy reduction during soda intro, and reduction cooling from 2300-1800F. I scanned the sides that were more interesting, or showed more variation. Hope this helps you narrow down what you might be looking for with soda fired clay slips!