C6 Triaxial Blend. Robin’s Egg Blue, Bermuda Green, Cobalt Carb.

Here was a basic triaxial blend we did in my Celadon Glaze class. Essentially you’re mixing proportions of 3 different colorants in a systematic way. I recommend mixing 3 x 300g cups of a base formula

For our class, we used the base recipe:

Cone 6 Wide Firing Clear

Kona Feldspar 38

Whiting 14

Zinc Oxide 12

OM4 Ball Clay 15

Silica 30

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After mixing up 3 cups of your base recipe, choose your oxide or mason stain colorants. Mix them in and sieve.  Make yourself a chart, or follow this example:

Our 3 Colorants were Robin’s Egg Blue, Bermuda Green, and Cobalt Carbonate. The picture is self explanatory. (Note: We screwed up #11  either by adding in 80% C instead of B, or just dipping into cup #10 2x)

Colorants, Percentages

Cone 10 Greenware Slips (Engobes)

Here’s the newest round of slips for leather hard/stiff application.  All but #7 will work for bone dry application. Not tested (yet) for bisque application.  Fired to cone 10 flat in a hard reduction.  Left side is super thick, right side is thinner.  Clay body is a Hawthorn/Goldart/OM4  stoneware – nothing fancy.

c10 Engobes
C10 Engobe Recipes
C10 Engobe Tiles
C10 Engobe Tiles

#1 Greenware Slip: Grolleg Kaolin 40, OM4 Ball Clay 10, Custer 25, Silica 25
#2 Greenware Slip v.1: EPK 25, Grolleg 25, OM4 Ball Clay 10, Custer 25 Silica 25
#3 Bringle Slip: EPK 20, OM4 20, Neph. Sye. 25, Silica 30
#4 BS v.1: Grolleg 25, OM4 25, Neph. Sye. 25, Silica 25
#5 BS v.2: Grolleg 30, OM4 10, Neph Sye 20, Silica 20
#6 Coleman Clay: EPK 50, Silica 25, Custer 25, Frit 3110 5
#7 CC v.1: Grolleg 50, Silica 25, Custer 25, Frit 3110 5
#8 Porcelain Slip: Grolleg 30, OM4 8, Custer 30, Silica 30, Bentonite 2

Pete's Clear
Glazed C10 Engobes

The light is cheating these a little bit. #1,2, and 8 seem to be the whitest, with not much differentiating them. #1 seems to promote the best celadon blues, although timing is critical, because it cracked when applied to a bone dry tile.  #2 seems to be a perfect middle ground in terms of versatility, cost, and whiteness. In my experience, the difference between a 50/50 grolleg/epk and a 100% grolleg clay body is negligible in cone 10 reduction.  The case could be made that it really matters in oxidation – which is just now bringing to mind the need to test these in c6 oxidation.

My picks? For Whiteness:

#2__Greenware Slip___

EPK 25, Grolleg 25, OM4 10, Custer 25, Silica 25, 45cc Water, 5cc Darvan #7,

For Celadon Blue:

#8__Porcelain Slip___

Grolleg 30, OM4 8, Custer 30, Silica 30, Bentonite 2, 50cc Water, 5cc Darvan #7

4 Color Marbled Clay

White Stoneware, Mason Stains
Laying out the stain on my table. Sprayed to dampen.
Wedging in the green. It takes a long time, especially to completely mix in the stain.
Keep wedging, and wedging, and wedging.
The colored clays after 45 minutes of wedging in the stains. Each ball is about 1 kg.
A cross section of the layered clays. To layer, cut small slabs from the colored clays. Stack them up and pat them together. Try to avoid adding in air bubbles.
After layering the clays, I like to give the layered ball of clay a quick couple of wedges to striate the layers. After you've striated the layers, you have a lot of options for cutting open the clay to reveal different patterns.